Q: Who or what is Expo 17?
Q: Why "Expo 17" instead of "Expo 2017"?
Q: What is the significance of the four colours in the Expo 17 logo?
Q: What is a Sesqui­centennial?
Q: What is the BIE?
Q: What is a recognised exhibition?
Q: What is a housing exhibition?
Q: What is a horticultural exhibition?
Q: When can official BIE exhibitions be held?
Q: Do any other cities want to host Expo 17?
Q: Where and when is the next registered exhibition?
Q: Where and when is the next recognised exhibition?
Q: Why Montreal in 2017?
Q: Won't this cost a lot of money?

Q: Who or what is Expo 17?

A: Expo 17 is a federally registered entity set up for the purpose of promoting and planning a world's fair in Canada. Expo 17 is not affiliated with the city of Montreal or any other government body or organisation.

Q: Why "Expo 17" instead of "Expo 2017"?

A: "Expo 17" is easier to articulate and promote, and builds upon the nostalgia of Expo 67 while appealing to youth and vitality, i.e., the teens of the new millennium.

Q: What is the significance of the four colours in the Expo 17 logo?

A: The four colours represent the ancient elements: Earth (green), Fire (red), Water (blue) and Air (yellow).

Q: What is a Sesqui­centennial?

A: A Sesqui­centennial is a 150th anniversary or its celebration. The term is derived from "sesqui" which means one and a half times.

Q: What is the BIE?

A: The Bureau International des Expositions (BIE) is the governing body of international exhibitions. The BIE was formed in 1928 and is based in Paris.

Q: What is a recognised exhibition?

A: There are two major classifications of BIE exhibitions, registered and recognised. The registered exhibition is the largest possible, similar to Expo 67. It lasts up to six months. The recognised exhibition is smaller in scale and scope, and lasts up to three months. In 2017, only a recognised exhibition will be allowed by the BIE.

Q: What is a housing exhibition?

A: An international housing exhibition is a type of exhibition that has recently emerged from Europe. It is not yet governed by the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE). A housing exhibition is very often used as a catalyst to reclaim industrial sites or regenerate areas in a state of urban decline.

Q: What is a horticultural exhibition?

A: A horticultural exhibition, or "flower expo", is a form of "special" exposition. It is officially named the "Floralies". It is jointly sanctioned by the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE) and the International Association of Horticultural Producers (AIPH). A specific nation is granted the right to hold a Floralies every 10 years. Montreal successfully staged the very first Floralies in North America, in 1980, on Ile Notre-Dame. Other horticultural exhibitions include the popular Qu├ębec en Fleur held in Quebec City. Though a BIE Floralies would be most desirable, this would be dependent on permission from the BIE.

Q: When can official BIE exhibitions be held?

A: The official span between one registered exhibition and the next is 5 years. The most recent registered exhibition was held in Aichi (Japan) in 2005. The next will be held in Shanghai (China) in 2010. One recognised exhibition is permitted in the years between registered exhibitions. A specific nation is granted the right to hold a BIE-approved exhibition, registered or recognised, every 15 years.

Q: Do any other cities want to host Expo 17?

A: As of April, 2007, Hamilton, Ontario and Edmonton, Alberta have also expressed interest in holding Expo 2017.

Q: Where and when is the next registered exhibition?

A: The next registered exhibition will be held in Shanghai (China) in 2010. Both Izmir (Turkey) and Milan (Italy) are candidates for the 2015 registered exhibition.

Q: Where and when is the next recognised exhibition?

A: The next recognised exhibition will be held in Zaragoza (Spain) in 2008.

Q: Why Montreal in 2017?

A: A number of factors were considered before choosing Montreal. These factors included the presence of both official languages, attractiveness and accessibility of location, availability of land, access to waterways, and opportunity for extensive social and environmental rehabilitation.

As can be seen in our current proposal, Montreal is very well positioned for
another exhibition. Nearly all the land needed is already owned by the city
and several other parcels have been recently transferred to the Canada Lands
Company to be sustainably developed.

Q: Won't this cost a lot of money?

A: Perhaps, but the eventual consequences of failing to unite our country and clean up the environment could cost us a lot more. Any exhibition will require a significant amount up front. However, this does not necessarily mean that an exhibition has to lose money or leave a crippling deficit. Believe it or not, some exhibitions have even closed with a profit. Expo 2005 in Japan, for instance, earned nearly 100 million CAN. It might also be argued that Expo 67 and Expo 86, despite their official closing deficits, made a substantial profit for the country. Both fairs brought a considerable improvement in balance of payments for tourism in the years they were held, while further attracting visitors thereafter. In other words, more people stayed in or visited Canada than going elsewhere on vacation, eventually bringing in the equivalent of many times the federal government's initial investment.